What if a jewelry collection could actually turn your body into a sculpture?


Corazón de Tierra, a collaboration between artists Georgina Treviño and Ozzie Juarez, was inspired by the future and the past, the city and the earth.

(Max Alo)

Corazón de Tierra could be the name of a telenovela about a group of stylish pre-Columbian ravers. It’s also what Georgina Treviño and Ozzie Juarez call their new collection of jewelry and fine objects inspired by these themes, available July 28 with Homegrown at Fred Segal.

Imagine going to a party and reaching for your pair of gravel and cubic zirconia-encrusted, Y2K wrap-around sunglasses or bamboo earrings — accessories that look made by hand from the stuff that built the city, the earth. “A relic,” Juarez says. “Something archaeological,” adds Treviño. You put them on and they transport you to another time — whether that’s the future or the past is up to you. That’s what this collection, born of a collaboration between two artists of different mediums but sharing a highly specific vision and “familiar souls,” can do: spark conversation.

Gravel encrusted bamboo earrings.

“You can frame these earrings. I think it’s something that can exist on your body or that can exist [on its own],” Treviño says.

(Max Alo)

Ozzie Juarez wears a denim jacket and wraparound sunglasses.

The collection is built with the special gravel mixture that Ozzie Juarez uses as a base layer on his paintings as a “thing of the city” — a nod to L.A.’s architecture of heavily stuccoed buildings and popcorn ceilings.

(Max Alo)

A plastic purse encrusted with gravel and cubic zirconia.

The artists experimented with the objects they could put the gravel on, which end up looking incredibly heavy but are actually lightweight yet sturdy.

(Max Alo)

Treviño, a contemporary jeweler and artist, is known for her expansive ideas and sense of humor around what jewelry and art can be — a fake cockroach, live flowers, pierced and airbrushed keys. Juarez, artist and founder of Tlaloc Studios, creates transformative paintings that he once described as “making portals.” To collaborate felt like the most organic thing in the world — something they didn’t even consciously decide to do but happened magnetically. (Juarez and Treviño met when he modeled a piece she made for a Lujo Depot campaign.)

The idea sprouted during one of their studio visits. Treviño got a closer look at Juarez’s process, namely the special gravel mixture he uses as a base layer on his paintings as a “thing of the city” — a nod to L.A.’s architecture of heavily stuccoed buildings and popcorn ceilings. “There’s this aesthetic that is kind of a language that has been woven in between a lot of our peers that has to do with the architecture, the landscape of Los Angeles,” Juarez says. “It just becomes super reminiscent of our childhood and how we grew up.” For Juarez, the gravel also serves as a symbolic reference to his ancestors and their use of adobe.

Ozzie Juarez and Georgina Treviño.

“Later on, this piece can exist and can tell our story — what was happening between us. It’s a little piece of time that a person could keep,” Treviño, pictured with Juarez, says.

(Max Alo)

Treviño’s wheels started turning. What else could they put this gravel on to come up with accessories that look incredibly heavy but are actually lightweight yet sturdy? “The idea [was] using this substrate, this dirt to create something really beautiful, to create structure,” Juarez says. “We’re making sunglasses, we’re making purses, we’re making objects, and we’re making them out of this land, which is super beautiful.”

Juarez made Treviño a special batch and she started experimenting with it, putting it on contemporary, pop-culture jewelry like bamboo hoops and adding her Treviño-touches, like cubic zirconia. “It’s so interesting, because it’s a typical bamboo earring — it’s not that expensive — but that’s also what we’re playing with by adding this artwork to it,” Treviño says. “You can frame these earrings. I think it’s something that can exist on your body or that can exist [on its own].”

She made a sculpture of an Olmec head wearing earrings, tooth charms and a septum piercing that “had a raver vibe” and is one of the most important pieces in the collection, Treviño says, almost like a physical symbol of their collaboration: “It was our baby.” They photographed it and put it on a T-shirt for the collection, which also includes the sunglasses, the bamboo earrings, a purse and a number of one-of-one sculptural objects. But really, they’re treating every piece in this collection as sculpture. “They’re just sculptures for your body,” Treviño says.

The artist carries an Olmec head sculpture.

The Olmec head wearing earrings, tooth charms and a septum piercing, with its “raver vibe,” symbolizes the collaboration, Treviño says.

(Max Alo)

An Olmec head sculpture.

“It was our baby,” Treviño says of the Olmec head sculpture.

(Max Alo)

Corazó de Tierra white T-shirt with Olmec head sculpture.

The artists photographed the Olmec head and put it on a T-shirt for the collection, which also includes sunglasses, bamboo earrings, a purse and a number of one-of-one sculptural objects.

(Max Alo)

More than anything, the collection is a time capsule. “It’s also capturing a moment in time,” Treviño says. “I think it’s so beautiful what’s happening in L.A. I nourish all my artist friends, and so I think coming together like that, making a piece together, for me, it’s so beautiful. Later on, this piece can exist and can tell our story — what was happening between us. It’s a little piece of time that a person could keep.”

Creative direction and styling: Georgina Treviño
Photography: Max Alo
Production and styling assistant: Marissa Channing
Hair: Jocelyn Vega
Makeup: Maya Nakara
Location: Tlaloc Studios





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